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Even if You Believe You’re Poor, You Still Need a Will for Minor Valuables

The current economy is constantly dropping new people down near the poverty line. Yet even if you’ve used up all of your savings in recent years and don’t own any land or “real” property, you almost certainly own things that family members or friends might cherish when you pass away.                                                                                                                                             Take a minute to review the following list of items that many of us often own and forget have special value, even if no one on eBay might want to buy them. The average person owns much more than he or she often realizes.

Types of Possessions You Really Should Include in a Will – Sooner Rather Than Later

  • Your car. Even if it’s a bit older, if you have the title in your name, you’re bound to have a family member or friend who might really need it.  If not, give it to your place of worship or a charitable group for a needy person.  Just be sure to carefully note in your will where the title is kept so the new owner can readily transfer the title after you’ve passed away;
  • Special family furniture, dishes, silverware -- and even photos. Over the years, particularly after both of your own parents have passed away, you may realize that you actually own some unique furniture that will soon acquire antique status. Give serious thought to giving it to someone you love in your family, carefully noting in your will that you hope the beneficiary/recipient will keep the item(s) in the family for years to come. The same is true regarding beautiful glassware and silverware, even if it’s quite limited. Finally, be sure to give your special photo albums (or photos on disks) to members of the family, asking them to personally preserve these family history treasures for years to come;
  • Personal stamp collections, guns, hobby/craft items – as well as sporting and exercise equipment. Nearly everyone would appreciate possibly inheriting your functional treadmill, bicycle or other similar property. The same is true of items you’ve collected for years, even if their market value is limited. Many men still possess large collections of baseball and football cards that are quite valuable – or have fishing rods or sets of golf clubs that someone else might enjoy. Women frequently have special quilts, magazine collections and craft tools that might benefit others – as well as special sporting goods or exercise equipment;
  • Your personal book collection. Many people who read a lot accumulate dozens of books over the years. The same is true regarding many DVDs. Even if you just name close friends or your local library as beneficiaries/recipients, you’ll be delighting many others for years to come.

 

Be sure to take the time to create a will soon so that these possessions will wind up in the hands of those who will appreciate them the most. Also, keep in mind that some attorneys will offer special rates to those who only need help creating very simple wills.


Shane Smith
Advocate for the Seriously Injured in Georgia