Go to navigation Go to content
Toll-Free: (888) 927-6955
Phone: (770) 487-8999
Law Offices of Shane Smith

Contact Us

Get help now! Please fill out the quick contact form below for a fast and free case consultation. We will contact you within 24 hours!

New Technology May Reduce Teen Distracted and Drowsy Driving

Distracted driving accidents killed 3,092 people in 2010 according to the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT). Additionally, it is estimated that 18 percent of auto accidents that year involved distracted drivers.

 

Consulting a Clayton County attorney after an auto accident involving a distracted driver enhances a victim's ability to receive a reasonable settlement. If you have been injured in an automobile accident involving a distracted driver in Clayton County you should discuss your case with an auto accident attorney at the Law Offices of Shane Smith.

 

According to a survey of teen drivers conducted by the Pew Research Center, over 33 percent of drivers between the ages of 16 and 17 admitted that they had texted while driving. More than half of the teens in the study who owned cell phones admitted to talking on a cell phone while driving. Though Georgia law restricts such actions for young drivers, new technology could reduce such activities even further.

 

Georgia teen drivers are prohibited from using a cell phone to talk or text but the fines are relatively small and enforcement challenges have rendered the laws largely ineffective. Additionally, there are no Georgia laws that address teen drowsy driving.

 

According to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, teen drivers who start school earlier in the morning are more likely to be involved in an auto accident. This correlation was further proved when teen accident rates were reduced by almost 17 percent in one county that started school one hour later.

 

A new headset device has an infrared sensor that monitors driver drowsiness. The headset plays music, vibrates or activates flashing lights if it determines that a driver is not alert.

 

A new program has been adopted in 38 states that will require parents to install a device in their teens' cars that disables a cell phone so it cannot be used for calling or texting. The device also remotely monitors teen driving behavior and texts the driving violations to another cell phone.

 

According to a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimate, 5 to 6 percent of all passenger vehicles on the road at any given time are driven by people using cell phones. It also estimates that over 10 percent of all drivers are using a hand-held device either with hands-free functionality or requiring manual input.

 

The USDOT concluded that based on cell phone carrier data, approximately 1 million motorists nationwide talk on cell phones or send messages while in a car. This data is derived from the number of calls and texts that occur during peak driving times.

 

If you or someone you know has been hurt by a distracted driver, meet with a Clayton County auto accident lawyer at the Law Offices of Shane Smith.


Shane Smith
Advocate for the Seriously Injured in Georgia