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Georgia Roads Remain Dangerous for Pedestrians but Improve for Drivers


Posted on Aug 31, 2012

The good news is that the rate of pedestrian deaths across this nation has decreased over the years. The bad news is that the number of Georgia pedestrian fatalities has increased since 2001. During the last decade, the roads in Georgia have become safer for drivers, but they are more dangerous for walkers.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Georgia pedestrian deaths have become a larger share of the state’s overall traffic fatalities. For instance, in 2001, there were 146 pedestrian deaths, accounting for nine percent of the state’s 1,615 traffic deaths that year. By 2010, 168 walkers died on Georgia roads, accounting for 13.5 percent of the state’s 1,244 traffic fatalities in that year.

These statistics indicate that while Georgia fatal roadway deaths are decreasing, the amount of pedestrians killed annually has dramatically risen and has become a larger share of the state’s traffic deaths—making the state a safer place for drivers, but not for walkers.

The national rate of pedestrian deaths is 1.38 deaths per 100,000 people, and Georgia is 25 percent higher than those figures at 1.73 deaths per 100,000 people. Because of these figures, NHTSA Administrator David Strickland reminds pedestrians to use crosswalks and intersections whenever possible. 

Our Atlanta pedestrian accident attorneys at the Law Offices of Shane Smith also would like to remind pedestrians of the importance of walking defensively for their own safety. We encourage drivers to pay close attention to walkers, especially in areas of high pedestrian concentration, to reduce the risk of a pedestrian accident.

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