Posted on Aug 17, 2013

On July 24, 2013, a motorcycle accident in Marietta resulted in the death of a 56-year-old Kennesaw motorcyclist. According to reports, this fatal Georgia motorcycle crash occurred Wednesday night around 10:30 p.m. at Cobb Parkway and White Avenue.

A 1980 Harley Davidson motorcycle, which was operated by 56-year-old Michael A. Michael, was heading southbound on Cobb Parkway when a driver of a 2001 Mazda Millenia crashed into the motorcycle. According to Marietta Police Officer David Auld, the driver of the Mazda Millenia was traveling northbound on Cobb Parkway and was attempting to turn left onto White Avenue at the time of the collision.

The initial investigation revealed that the Mazda driver, 21-year-old Chevelle Gore, of Powder Springs, turned into the path of the Harley Davidson and caused Mr. Michael to crash into the right front of the vehicle.

Unfortunately, Mr. Michael suffered critical injuries upon impact and was taken to Well Star Kennestone Hospital for medical treatment. Sadly, he died from his injuries.

Police are still investigating this deadly Marietta crash, and charges are pending the results of the investigation. Police are asking anyone with information to call Officer Geoff Culpepper at 770.794.5357.

As Marietta accident attorneys, we are aware that drivers of passenger vehicles and trucks are not always looking out for motorcyclists. Failure to be on the lookout for motorcycles is often the cause of serious and fatal motorcycle crashes within our state. The Law Offices of Shane Smith would like to remind drivers to constantly look for motorcycles before changing lanes, turning, or exiting a driveway, and we would like to extend our deepest condolences to the family and friends of Mr. Michael.

Read More About Marietta Motorcycle Accident Claims Life of Kennesaw Motorcyclist...

Shane Smith
Advocate for the Seriously Injured in Georgia

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