Traumatic Brain Symptoms and Post Concussion Syndrome

Post-concussion syndrome, a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by an impact to the head, may not be identified without expert medical attention following an accident. A Clayton County brain injury lawyer at the Law Office of Shane Smith can pursue a Georgia personal injury claim.  

Auto accidents are among the leading causes of TBI in the United States. It is estimated that over 1.4 million people suffer from a brain injury each year in the United States.

Misdiagnosis following an accident can be caused because symptoms may not be apparent. Someone suffering from a TBI may lose temporary consciousness immediately after an accident yet not feel any effects a short time later. Short-term memory loss may occur weeks or months after the accident. Other people suffer massive injuries with memory difficulties similar to Alzheimer's patients.

Headaches and dizziness, the most common post-concussion syndrome symptoms, may not develop for up to 10 days after an automobile accident, slip-and-fall, or jostling accident. The victim's symptoms will often disappear within a few months but it is possible for discomfort or cognitive effects to be felt for over a year. A victim may have mild to severe headaches, attention deficit problems, behavioral changes, and short- and long-term memory loss in severe post-concussion syndrome diagnoses.

An experienced Clayton County brain injury attorney may seek compensation for the following:

  • Medical expenses;
  • Physical therapy;
  • Lost income;
  • Pain and suffering;
  • Emotional distress;
  • Permanent incapacitation or disability.

Shane Smith Law will aggressively pursue a brain injury case to get fair compensation for the victim. Call Clayton County brain injury lawyer Shane Smith for a free consultation.

Categories: 
Related Posts
  • When Children Are Parties in Personal Injury Claims Read More
  • What Are Contingency Fees in a Personal Injury Case? Read More
  • What Can Cause Commercial Vehicle Accidents? Read More
/